Here’s some advice all founders should take when it comes to getting product feedback

Here’s some advice all founders should take when it comes to getting product feedback

One topic that all founders are obsessed with (and if they aren’t, they should be) is Product. At the end of the day you can raise a lot of money, have a great team, but if your product sucks, you’ll be misusing both. While most of my posts tend to be about raising money at the Seed stage, I thought it was time to throw a product post into the mix since this is so damn important that it deserves some real attention.

When it comes to experts in the product world, one of the people I truly respect is Brian Norgard. Brian was the Chief Product Officer at Tinder and before that he was the founder of Tappy, a startup that was acquired by – you guessed it, Tinder. Before that Brian started Chill, a Facebook app that got 30M+ users…and before that, Newroo, which was acquired by FOX Interactive.

So, it’s safe to say that Brian knows a lot about how to position, grow, and get feedback about products. When Brian shares advice, me and many others listen, and today he shared some pretty solid advice about getting feedback about your product. Here it is:

Brian Norgard Product Feeback

Brian makes a great point here and it’s one that I don’t think many people think about. Be honest – when you want to get feedback about your product, how often do you find yourself asking people “Do you like my product?”

This is also probably why you feel like everyone loves your product. You showed your friends and family, people you trust, and asked them “do you like my product” and they said, “yes” so you assume your product is a hit.

The problem is, this question doesn’t really help you learn, instead it serves to give you the answer you want to hear, i.e. that people like your product. The first question Brian suggests is a great one, “Can you explain this product to me?” Think of how much you would learn if you asked someone that doesn’t have intimate knowledge of your product (like you do) to explain your product to you. They might screw it up, and how they screw it up should be super interesting to you.

Another great question – “How does this product make you feel?” I bet you’ve never asked anyone that…if you have, kudos to you.

The point here is a good one and it’s why me and many other people liked and retweeted Brian’s tweet. If you’re looking for feedback on your product, get creative, ask questions that you can learn from, not questions that will tell you what you want to hear. At the end of the day, you learn the most from feedback that you might not want to hear, but you probably need to hear to make a better product.

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